Recorded ACGB Webinars

Death in the Public Eye
Death in the Public Eye

Lecture Overview

This recording is of our 2019 Annual Grief Lecture; Death in the Public Eye which saw five panelists come together to discuss; Those who experience a bereavement that is marked by violence, suddenness or due to human actions are forced to navigate two worlds - one populated by the media, the coroner, the legal system and public curiosity and a second, less visible world, of private grief. The 2019 grief lecture will examine what transpires when a death takes place in the public eye. The role and impact of the legal system, a coronial investigation, and the scrutiny of the media will be explored. The lecture will also examine impact upon the bereaved person, and the role played by bereavement counselling and support.

 

Panelists

Coroner Rosemary Carlin, Dr Ian Freckelton, Karen Percy, Walter Mikac AM and Dr Jane Mowll

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The Quest for Meaning: A Conversation with Robert Neimeyer
The Quest for Meaning: A Conversation with Robert Neimeyer
Presenter: Robert A. Neimeyer, PhD

Recorded: December 5, 2018

Webinar Overview

When grieving is conceived as a process of reaffirming or reconstructing a wold of meaning that has been challenged by loss, grief therapy becomes a process of collaborating with clients in processing the “event story” of the death itself and its implications for clients’ ongoing lives, and in accessing the “back story” of their relationship with the deceased to restore a sense of attachment security and to address unfinished business. Doing so requires a vulnerable offer of presence on the part of both therapist and client, as well as a delicate reading of the process of therapy that assists both in identifying and addressing clients’ specific implicit needs and readiness to address them.

Led by the interests of participants in the webinar, Neimeyer is open to discussing all aspects of meaning reconstruction as a trauma-informed and attachment-informed intervention, as well as its possible relevance to difficult cases brought forward for consultation.  Equally, at the discretion of questioners, he can share selected results of recent research with his collaborators on such topics as network analyses of complicated grief and post traumatic growth, social validation and invalidation of mourners’ meaning-making efforts, the role of meaning in mediating the impact of numerous risk factors for complication in bereavement, and the assessment of unfinished business in relation to the deceased.

This webinar will be suitable for bereavement support workers and grief therapists with experience in dealing with complex processes that both hinder and facilitate adaptation to life-altering loss.

Learning Outcomes

Following this webinar participants will:

  • Distinguish two major dimensions of meaning reconstruction in bereavement.
  • Identify the three “P” principles that shape the practice of grief therapy.
  • Determine markers of client need and readiness to engage a particular focus.
  • Select and appropriate technique or strategy to maximise therapeutic change.
  • Work with resistance to change as an aid rather than impediment to therapy.
  • Summarise the most recent findings arising in research on meaning making.

     

Presenter Biography

Robert A. Neimeyer, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Psychology, University of Memphis, where he also maintains an active clinical practice. Since completing his doctoral training at the University of Nebraska in 1982, he has conducted extensive research on the topics of death, grief, loss, and suicide intervention.

Neimeyer has published 30 books, including Techniques of Grief Therapy:  Creative Practices for Counseling the Bereaved and Grief and the Expressive Arts: Practices for Creating Meaning, the latter with Barbara Thompson. The author of nearly 500 articles and book chapters, he is currently working to advance a more adequate theory of grieving as a meaning-making process, both in his published work and through his frequent professional workshops for national and international audiences.

Neimeyer is the Editor of the respected international journal, Death Studies, and served as President of the Association for Death Education and Counseling. In recognition of his scholarly contributions, he has been granted the Distinguished Research Award, the Distinguished Teaching Award, and the Eminent Faculty Award by the University of Memphis, elected Chair of the International Work Group on Death, Dying, and Bereavement, and given the Research Recognition, Clinical Practice and Lifetime Achievement Awards  by the Association for Death Education and Counseling. Most recently, he has received the Phoenix Award: Rising to the Service of Humanity from the MISS Foundation, been given ADEC's Lifetime Achievement Award, and been recognised as an Honored Associate of the Viktor Frankl Association for his lifetime contributions to the study of meaning.

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Religion, Belief and Spirituality in End of Life Care
Religion, Belief and Spirituality in End of Life Care
Presenter: Panagiotis Pentaris

Recorded: December 12, 2018

Webinar Overview: Religion, Belief and Spirituality in End of Life Care

This webinar is focused around increasing literacy in religion, belief and spirituality in end of life care.

This webinar would be useful for hospice and palliative care professionals, practicing in end of life settings and in the community; including medical doctors, nurses, hospice social workers, psychologists, Chaplaincy in hospitals and hospices and Health and social care professionals more widely.

The aim of this webinar is twofold. First, to introduce and examine the pressing need for increased literacy in how professionals in end of life care respond to religion, belief and spiritual identities of service users (inclusive of families and friends). Next, to present and discuss a religious literacy model for end of life practitioners, towards achieving better care in this domain.

Those that will benefit most from this webinar are hospice and palliative care staff that work with people in critical conditions and families and friends who are experiencing the imminent loss. Also, researchers in the area of how religion and end of life care intersect would benefit from this webinar as well.

This webinar is aimed at an introduction and intermediate levels. That said, it is desirable that participants acquire some knowledge about hospice and palliative care as the webinar will not focus on explaining this area of practice, but participants can either have excessive knowledge and skills in spiritual care in hospice and palliative practice, or be in the very beginning of their career, without particular expertise.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this webinar, participants should be able to:

  • Have an enhanced understanding of the ongoing relationship of religion, belief and spirituality with end of life care
  • The ability to critically appraise the necessity for further dialogue and exploration in this area;
  • The ability to apply a religious literacy model as continuing professional development;
  • To critically examine a value-based framework through which religious literacy can be more effective.

Presenter Bio: Dr Panagiotis Pentaris

Dr Panagiotis Pentaris is a Senior Lecturer for the Department of Psychology, Social Work and Counselling at the University of Greenwich. He is also a Postdoc Research Fellow for the Faiths & Civil Society Unit at Goldsmiths, University of London. Panagiotis is a thanatologist, as well as a qualified social worker with specialty in hospice social work, as well as clinical social work in end of life care. His research stretches from death policies to professional practice, while he has written widely about the intersection of religion and death and is focusing on professional practice and policy in these areas.

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Grieving the Loss of An Animal
Grieving the Loss of An Animal
Presenter: Bianca Lavorgna

Recorded: March 27, 2018

Webinar Overview: Grieving the Loss of An Animal

Human-animal loss experience may result in the bereaved individuals being highly vulnerable to insufficient societal support and unresolved grief. This webinar aims to explore the phenomena of grieving after the death of a companion animal and provide ideas and strategies that can be effective in offering support to those who are grieving. This is an Introductory level webinar designed for anyone working with those who have experienced the death of a companion animal, such as veterinarians, vet nurses, counsellors, teachers, therapists, psychologists and other allied health professionals.

Learning Outcomes:

At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Describe and understand the significance of having a companion animal die through current grief, trauma and bereavement theory 2. Acknowledge and validate the death appropriately and respond to the needs of the companion animal owner over time 3. Identify a range of strategies that can be used to support people and families who have experienced the death of a companion animal 4. Care for themselves as a support person who may also have a companion animal The Presenter- Bianca Lavorgna Bianca is a Specialist Bereavement Counsellor at the Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement with responsibilities for support groups, provision of supervision to volunteers, and delivery of education and training. She has extensive counselling, group work and educational experience, with expertise in the development, delivery and coordination of support services and programs. Bianca also comes with specialist knowledge and experience in working with children and adolescents with an interest in companion animal loss. Bianca has Master’s in Counselling and Psychotherapy from the Australian College of Applied Psychology and a Graduate Qualification in Bereavement Counselling from the Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement.
Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Alcohol and Other Drugs - Why a Person May Choose To Use
Alcohol and Other Drugs - Why a Person May Choose To Use
Presenter: Tony Johannsen

Recorded: February 21st, 2018

Webinar Overview: Alcohol and Other Drugs - Why a Person May Choose To Use

This webinar aims to; dispel some of the myths around substance use and substance users, to explore the underlying factors that may contribute to a person’s choice to use substances, to analyse the affects that different types of substances have on the central nervous system, to examine the life events that may increase the probability of a person using substances and to discuss the ways in which a therapist may work (therapeutically) with a substance user.

This webinar is a beginner to intermediate level designed for anyone working in social services, counselling, psychotherapy or case management who wishes to increase their knowledge about the intersection of substance use, trauma (including developmental), mental health, attachments styles, grief and loss. This webinar aims to increase people’s awareness and understanding of substance use and substance users. This webinar is not for experienced AOD counsellors. This webinar intends to increase the knowledge base and expertise of individuals grappling with the often very difficult question of “how do I engage with a substance user in a more emphatic and therapeutic manner”.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this webinar, participants should be able to:

  • A clearer understanding of substances (drugs) and their affects on the central nervous system
  • Increased understanding of the relationship between, trauma (including developmental), attachment style, shame, grief & loss and substance use.
  • A more robust understanding of how to engage emphatically and therapeutically with a person using substances
  • Increased knowledge of co-morbidity (a co-occurrence of substance use and mental health issues).

Presenter Bio: Tony Johannsen

Tony is a forensic drug and alcohol clinician who specialises in working with complex clients. Tony also works in the field of Family Violence as a Men’ Behaviour Change Facilitator. Through working with mandated forensic clients, Tony has come to understand that substance use is a far more complex issue than the broader public often acknowledge. “Most clients I work with have experienced numerous traumas and developmental setbacks throughout their lives. I am yet to work with a problematic substance user who has not been or traumatized at some point in their history. I feel the traditional narratives for substance users are now very outdated”.

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Supporting Those Who Have Experienced Sudden Grief or Loss
Supporting Those Who Have Experienced Sudden Grief or Loss
Presenter: Lynne Halamish

Recorded: April 24th, 2018

Webinar Overview: Supporting Those Who Have Experienced Sudden Grief or Loss

This webinar aims to provide practical tools for professionals and laypeople when encountering the suddenly bereaved.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this webinar, participants should be able to:

  • Improved communication skills at point of contact with griever
  • Reduced helplessness in the face of sudden grief;
  • Practical Applicable tools to support grieving persons;
  • Improved understanding of the impact of sudden unexpected death

Presenter Bio: Lynne Halamish

Over two and a half decades of counselling experience with severely ill persons and their families during both illness and bereavement. Counseling of persons suddenly bereaved by terror, accident, illness or violence of any kind. Teaching and lecturing extensively in Europe, the Middle East, Russia and the USA. In-hospital staff training particularly in departments with high mortality rates. Co-author of The Weeping Willow: Encounters with Grief.

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Approaches to Self Care
Approaches to Self Care
Presenter: Kylie Duncan

Recorded: May 23rd, 2018

Webinar Overview: Approaches to Self Care for those working in the field of Grief and Bereavement

The webinar aims to teach listeners about the importance of self care and the impact of Vicarious Traumatisation/Compassion Fatigue in the context of working with grief and bereavement. It will go through a practical understanding of compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma, linking it to the current field and provide a range of personal and professional self care strategies. This will also look at how to use mindfulness to be aware of how stress affects us, and Identify how to care for ourselves in these situations.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this webinar, participants should be able to:

  • Understanding what self care is and the importance of self care for those working in the field of grief and bereavement;
  • Gaining an understanding of stress, how it happens, how our body reacts during stress and different types of stress;
  • Gaining an understanding of Vicarious Trauma, Burnout and Compassion Fatigue;
  • Learning about the signs of stress in the context of Compassion Fatigue from a holistic perspective;
  • Ability to recognise ones’ own symptoms of stress;
  • Learning about specific issues related to self care for grief and bereavement workers;
  • Becoming aware of various tools available to measure stress related issues;
  • Developing a Compassion Fatigue prevention/stress resiliency toolkit;
  • Looking at ways in which organisations can support Compassion Fatigue in the workplace;
  • Looking at ways in which peer groups can support processors to help prevent Compassion Fatigue;

Presenter Bio: Kylie Duncan

Kylie Duncan is a Social Worker with over 20 years of experience as a counsellor with the majority of her career spent working in the field of grief and bereavement with individuals and their families. Kylie currently works in Palliative care in Northern NSW. She has extensive experience in counselling, group work and providing education with expertise in grief and bereavement, end of life issues, compassion fatigue and self care. Kylie is passionate about supporting people to remain connected and empowered as they move towards the end of their lives or as they support their loved ones as they move toward the end of their lives.

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Grief Associated With Sexual and Institutional Abuse
Grief Associated With Sexual and Institutional Abuse
Presenter: Julie Blyth
Recorded: June 27th, 2018

Webinar Overview: Grief Associated With Sexual and Institutional Abuse

This webinar aims to look at the relationship between child sexual abuse and grief and loss in later life. To view this in the light of the findings of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to child sexual abuse, and to look at helpful responses to survivors and their families.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this webinar, participants should be able to:

  • Why child sexual abuse is so impactful
  • The gender differences in these impacts
  • What we have learned from the Royal Commission about these impacts
  • The relationship between loss and grief and the trauma of child sexual abuse
  • What are helpful responses that assist in recovery and healing

Presenter Bio: Julie Blyth

Julie Blyth was the Clinical Advisor at the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse,over the past 5 years, leading a team who provided support and counselling to all who engaged with the Commission. She has a Social Work background and worked extensively in counselling, training and consultancy in responding to the trauma of violence and abuse.

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Supporting Those With Families Transitioning To Aged Care
Supporting Those With Families Transitioning To Aged Care
Presenter: Dr Brenda Bentley
Recorded: July 25th, 2018

Webinar Overview: Supporting Those With Families Transitioning To Aged Care

This webinar provides information and shares knowledge about the psychological processes that are occurring for people who are transitioning to aged care and their families so that clinicians can help to provide emotional and psychosocial support to family members. This webinar would be useful for those people who provide support for families of people going into aged care.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this webinar, participants should be able to:

  • Identify changing roles for family members during aged care transition
  • Discuss the changing concept of “home” during aged care transition
  • Understand William Bridges model of transition and identify strategies to support family members during each transition stage
  • Describe the concept of ambiguous loss and apply this concept to family member support during aged care transitions
  • Recognise the importance of supporting the dignity of people going into aged care for the benefit of all family members
  • Evaluate strategies for managing family conflict during aged care transitions
  • List key factors identified in research that contribute to successful transitions to aged care

Presenter Bio: Dr Brenda Bentley

Dr Brenda Bentley is a counselling psychologist who specialises in providing psychosocial support to people with life-limiting conditions and their family members. She is a senior lecturer at Murdoch University in the postgraduate counselling program where she formerly served as the discipline head. Her research focus is on improving wellbeing for patients and families at the end of life and into bereavement. Brenda is a registered Clinical Counsellor with the Australian Counselling Association and the Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia. She is also certified Counselling Supervisor who supports counsellors who work with people and families confronting illess and death.

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Bereavement of Same-Sex Partners: Implications for Practice
Bereavement of Same-Sex Partners: Implications for Practice
Presenter: Lefteris Patlamazoglou

Recorded: September 5th, 2018

Webinar Overview: Bereavement of Same-Sex Partners: Implications for Practice

The increasing legal acknowledgement, visibility and sociocultural inclusivity on a global scale has seen an growing number of LGBTIG-identifying individuals seeking counselling and psychological support. This webinar will provide an enhanced understanding of the experiences of bereaved same-sex-attracted partners and the impact of grief and bereavement on subsequent romantic and sexual relationships. Implications for counselling and psychological practice and support will be discussed and suggestions for further research will be noted. The webinar will draw upon recent findings of relevant research and existing literature.

Those that would benefit from this webinar are social workers, counsellors, psychologists, palliative care workers, mental health practitioners and students who would like to enhance their knowledge about the bereavement of same-sex-attracted individuals and its impact on the creation, maintenance and quality of subsequent intimate relationships following the death of a same-sex partner.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this webinar, participants should be able to:

  • Develop a further understanding of the bereavement of same-sex partners based on findings of recent research findings
  • Identify the coping styles of same-sex bereaved partners
  • Distinguish the similarities and differences in the experiences of bereaved same-sex-attracted and heterosexual partners
  • Acquire practical tools in order to work effectively with bereaved same-sex-attracted partners, their friends, and family
  • Improve their awareness of the impact of bereavement due to the loss of a same-sex partner on intimate relationships
  • Increase their sensitivity toward the experiences of same-sex partners in order to improve their counselling, clinical and research practice
  • Describe the factors that contribute to disenfranchised grief and its impact on bereavement

Presenter Bio: Lefteris Patlamazoglou

Lefteris Patlamazoglou is a registered psychologist with experience in the areas of grief and bereavement. He has worked extensively with clients with a variety of mental health and fertility issues as well as court-ordered parents and their children. Lefteris is also a lecturer of online, on-campus, and offshore postgraduate counselling and psychology subjects at Monash University. He is an experienced researcher and presenter with particular interest in understanding the bereavement of LGBTIQ+ partners, its impact on intimate relationships and disenfranchised grief.

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Supporting Families Living with a Cancer Diagnosis
Supporting Families Living with a Cancer Diagnosis
Presenter: Jim Monahan, M.Ed., ACHE

Recorded: September 19th, 2018

Webinar Overview: Supporting Families Living with a Cancer Diagnosis

This webinar aims to provide guidance on areas of exploration to address while working with a person with cancer and their family. Topics related to emotional, spiritual, physical and social challenges will be addressed. The ideas discussed may also be utilised by those working with or helping individuals and families with other diseases.

This webinar will benefit professional and lay helpers who provide counselling or assistance to individuals with cancer and their families. Suggested topics of exploration or conversation will be offered as well as discussion on self care and boundaries.

Webinar attendees should have counselling skills, experience working with individuals with life threatening diseases and experience working with families.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this webinar, participants should be able to:

  • Areas for exploration with a person living with the challenges of cancer.
  • Practical questions to use while exploring the challenges of living with cancer.
  • How to assist the person with cancer to develop coping strategies.
  • How grief is a natural part of living with cancer.

Presenter Bio: Jim Monahan, M.Ed., ACHE

Jim Monahan has been engaged in hospice work for almost 30 years. He has worked as a patient and family counsellor, bereavement counsellor and educator. He has provided training in Australia, New Zealand, England, China and Portugal. He was a national trainer for the American Association of Retired Person’s Bereavement Services and wrote and delivered training for a national program to support those impacted by September 11. He has taught death and dying in college. Among his publications is a chapter in the book Hospice Care for Children that he co-authored with J. William Worden on parental grief.

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Family Bereavement After the Loss of a Child
Family Bereavement After the Loss of a Child
Presenter: Danielle Graber

Recorded: October 3rd, 2018

Webinar Overview: Family Bereavement After the Loss of a Child

This webinar aims to provide an introduction and overview of grief and bereavement following the death of a child. Including; how to respond and support parents and families following the loss, (i.e., what to say and what not to say), the similarities and differences with loss at different stages and ages (e.g., early miscarriage versus infant loss), managing milestones (e.g., anniversaries) and a guide to available resources for the bereaved and for those trying to support them.

This webinar will benefit medical and allied health professionals who work in children’s hospitals, fertility clinics, private practice, emergency departments or community organisations as well as individuals who work with families and expectant mothers.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this webinar, participants should be able to:

  • Understand the different types of child loss
  • Distinguish the similarities and differences between the different types of child loss
  • Respond to a family after child loss
  • Have strategies for supporting a family after child loss
  • Have the resources available for families after child loss

Presenter Bio: Danielle Graber

Danielle is the Director of 12 Points Psychology. She is a clinical psychologist with over 12 years experience working with children, teens and adults in a variety of settings including; inpatient units, early parenting centres, community services agencies, schools and universities. Danielle has additional qualifications in medical science and animal-assisted therapy and draws on her diverse training and experience to provide individualised, client-centred psychological services to people with experiences of: mood and anxiety disorders, trauma, grief (including pet loss), chronic illness and personality disorders. She is looking forward to translating her clinical experience into engaging and relevant training sessions.

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Depression and End of Life Care
Depression and End of Life Care
Presenter: Jane Fletcher BA., Grad.Dip.Appl.Psych.

Recorded: October 24th, 2018

Webinar Overview: Depression and End of Life Care

This webinar will provide information about the identification, diagnosis and treatment of depression at end of life. Topics surrounding palliative care and psycho-oncology will be discussed.

There are no pre-requisites to attending this webinar and it will be suitable for those working in a palliative setting or working with individuals at end of life.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this webinar, participants should be able to:

  • Have an understanding of the diagnostic criteria for depression in a palliative setting.
  • Be able to distinguish depression from grief in a palliative setting.
  • Have an understanding of demoralization in a palliative setting.
  • Have an understanding of the treatment and management options for depression in a palliative setting.

Presenter Bio: Jane Fletcher BA., Grad.Dip.Appl.Psych.

Jane is a health psychologist with over 15 years experience in psycho-oncology and palliative care. She established, and is the director of, Melbourne Psycho-oncology Service, a specialist psycho-oncology private practice at Cabrini Health, Epworth Freemasons and St John of God Berwick. Jane holds an adjunct appointment with Monash University and has recently co-authored a book chapter titled Distinguishing and Managing Severe Psychological and Psychiatric Distress for the new Springer publication Textbook of Palliative Care. Jane has extensive experience dealing with depression, and the grief and loss at end of life. She is a member of a range of committees and working parties and speaks widely to both community and professional audiences.

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Difficult Conversations: Delivering Bad News
Difficult Conversations: Delivering Bad News
Presenter: Lynne Halamish

Recorded: November 21st, 2018


Webinar Overview: Difficult conversations: Delivering Bad News

The proposed aim of this webinar is to provide practical, applicable tools for those who will or must deliver bad news. The content of this webinar would be suited to Medical Personnel, Counsellors, Family members, Police, Fire fighters, Clergy, Disaster teams or anyone who needs to deliver bad news. 

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this webinar, participants should be able to:

Improve on their listening and communication skills   
See a reduction in the helplessness in the face of the task of delivering bad news
Have an improved understanding of what it is to receive bad news 
Increase their awareness and interpretation of body language    
Enhance their psychosocial adaptation of the reciever of bad news   
Avoid increasing distress unnecessarily

Presenter Bio: Lynne Halamish

Lynne Halamish has over two and a half decades of counselling experience with severely ill persons and their families during both illness and bereavement. She has extensive experience in the counseling of persons suddenly bereaved by accident, illness, violence or terror of any kind.
Lynne has taught and lectured extensively in Europe, the Middle East, Russia and the USA. She has specialized in in-hospital staff training particularly in departments with high mortality rates.
Lynne is also the co-author of “The Weeping Willow: Encounters with Grief”.

75.00
Missing Persons Grief and Loss
Missing Persons Grief and Loss
Presenter: Sarah Wayland

Recorded: January 23rd, 2019

Webinar Overview

This webinar will introduce and explore the inclusion of ambiguous loss in understanding the experiences of families of missing people. This webinar aims to identify current evidence-based interventions relevant to counselling, when addressing the needs of people with ambiguous or unresolved loss. This webinar also aims to create a space for professionals to reflect on their own capacity to tolerate ambiguity. 

This webinar is aimed at an introductory to intermediate level and will be suitable for:

  • Psychologists/Social workers/Counsellors with a special interest in grief and loss in ambiguous or complicated circumstances.
  • Those working in bereavement services, generalist counselling or with victims of crime.
  • Those who are curious about emerging areas of practice in the grief and loss space.
  • Health professionals who are keen to understand how knowledge about ambiguous loss may assist them in responding to trauma, family relationship issues and losses where information is incomplete about the manner and cause of that loss.

It is recommended that attendees have emerging or enhanced skills in grief and loss interventions, are professionals currently working with individuals or groups, or are researchers with an interest in complex grief or uncommon experiences of loss.

Learning Outcomes

Following this webinar participants will be able to:

  • Understand and define ambiguous loss.
  • Reflect on the incidence and prevalence of missing persons cases in Australia and understand the needs of those loved ones left behind.
  • Review the current evidence-based interventions relevant to the provision of counselling for people living with ambiguous loss.
  • Reflect on health professionals capacity to tolerate uncertainty, and the role of reflexive practice when working with complex loss experiences.

 

Presenter Biography

Dr Sarah Wayland works in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Sydney. Prior to starting a career as an academic, Sarah has worked since 1999 as a trauma counsellor and manager of state-wide counselling services as a Social Worker. She received her PhD, along with the Chancellors Medal, in 2015 from the School of Health, University of New England focussing on the experiences of hope for those left behind when a loved one is missing.

As a qualitative researcher, and previously as a mental health clinician, she actively engages consumers in her research and specialises in data collection and analysis of participants from vulnerable and marginalised population groups. Sarah is also a renowned researcher in the space of missing people. She regularly provides comment to mainstream media on the experiences of missing.

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Social Media and Grief
Social Media and Grief
Presenter: Birgit Wagner

Recorded: February 27th, 2019

Webinar Overview

Social media has evoked a fundamental shift in the way we communicate. Every minute billions of people share their lives and emotions through Facebook and Instagram in real time, and social media has become the primary source of communication for many people.

However, social media users also die, and the question arises: how do people cope with grief online? Social media has changed the cultural and social norms of mourning. News of death is often communicated via social media, and bereaved people look for support in online bereavement groups. Online, people can grieve the loss of someone in relative anonymity, without being in direct contact with the immediate family members. Digital resources for the bereaved include social media profiles of and for the bereaved, online support groups, blogs, memorial sites, grief accounts on Instagram and Twitter.

Even though social media can be a helpful part of coping with grief in finding social support, a number of ethical and critical questions need to be addressed. Can you ‘defriend’ a dead person? Can you ‘like’ it when someone has died? How should family members handle the social media account of a deceased person? How do bereaved people deal with negative comments about the deceased person or trolling? Is grief Instagrammable? Are online support groups helpful?

This webinar gives the opportunity to discuss these new aspects of mourning and to provide scientific knowledge of the impact of social media use and grief.

Suitable to counsellors, bereavement support workers, therapists, family members and medical personnel, this webinar aims to provide a practical guideline on the use of social media and to develop a better understanding on mourning norms in social media.

Learning Outcomes

Following this webinar you will:

  • Have learned about the appropriate use of social media and grief.
  • Have reflected on your own social media behaviour in the context of grief.
  • Acquired knowlegde of the efficacy of online-support groups for the bereaved.
  • Increased your knowledge of online mourning norms.

 

Presenter Biography

Birgit Wagner, PhD, completed her psychological education at the Freie University Berlin and received her PhD at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Birgit has been a professor of clinical psychology and behavioural therapy at the Medical School Berlin since 2013. She has extensive expertise in implementation of new technologies in the field of traumatic stress disorder and prolonged grief disorder. Dr. Wagner has been principal investigator in a large number of controlled trials involving Internet-based interventions in Germany, Switzerland and Arab conflict regions. She was also involved as principal investigator in several longitudinal studies and prevalence studies in the field of post traumatic stress disorders and prolonged grief. She is currently principal investigator on an online-based prevention for bereaved siblings and a web-based group intervention for bereavement after suicide. In all these studies the implementation of new technology in diagnostic assessments and psychotherapeutic interventions have been her major interest.

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Resilience and Approaches to Self-Care
Resilience and Approaches to Self-Care
Presenter: Andy Ho

Recorded: March 13th, 2019

Webinar Overview

End of life caregivers are prone to burnout and compassion fatigue given the intense emotional and existential nature of their work. Previous research has provided strong evidence that support the inclusion of art therapy within clinical supervision for it can effectively reduce work-related stress and enhance emotional health. Integrating the practice of mindfulness meditation in art therapy based supervision, with reflective awareness complementing emotional expression, has immense potential for self-care and collegial support, of which could ultimately cultivate compassion and sustained resilience among those immersed in the fields of palliative care and bereavement support.

This webinar presents the foundational knowledge on burnout, resilience and self-care. It will also provide the theoretical underpinnings and clinical framework of Mindful Compassion Art Therapy (MCAT), as well as, the findings of a Randomized Wait-List Control Trial that assess its efficacy for reducing burnout and promoting holistic wellness among 56 palliative care professionals in Singapore. Narratives and experiences of MCAT’s participants will be shared to illuminate the inner workings of this novel and promising psycho-intervention modality for enhancing end of life care provision via caring of caregivers.

Learning Outcomes

Following this webinar you will:

  • Understand the causes and effects of stress and burnout on caregivers, particular those immersed in the fields of palliative and bereavement care.
  • Understand the relationship bewtween burnout, compassionate fatigue and moral distress, and their impacts on holsitic health.
  • Discuss the current literature and research on resilience, mindful-compassion and expressive arts, and their intergration for promoting self-care.
  • Discuss the empirical foundation for integrating mindfulness meditation and art therapy for self-help and clinical supervision purposes.
  • Intergrate an empirical model of Mindful Compassion Art Therapy for supporting self and others emotionally, psychologically and spiritually within the context of palliative and bereavement care.

Presenter Biography

Dr Andy Hau Yan HO is Assistant Professor of Psychology and Joint Honorary Assistant Professor of Medicine at Nanyang Technological University Singapore. He serves as Board Director of the Association for Death Education and Counselling (ADEC), and the International Work Group of Death Dying and Bereavement (IWGDDB). Andy’s research and teaching focus on psychosocial gerontology, palliative and bereavement care, holistic therapy and community empowerment. He has authored over 70 top-tier journal articles, books, chapters and research reports; and presented over 130 keynote, plenary and invited presentations. Andy is the first Asian Recipient of the 2018 ADEC Academic Educator Award, whilst his scholarly contributions are recognized with distinction by academic and professional bodies around the world.

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Voluntary Assisted Dying – Understanding the Changes
Voluntary Assisted Dying – Understanding the Changes
Presenter: Lauren Breen

Recorded: April 24th, 2019

Understanding the Legislative Changes and Implications Relating to Voluntary Assisted Dying

Webinar Overview

This webinar aims to provide an overview of voluntary assisted dying and its implications, especially those relevant to mental health and social care professionals.

The webinar is aimed at an introductory to intermediate level of professional who will be affected by the legislative changes.

Learning Outcomes

Following this webinar you will:

  • Have an overview of the wider context and debates about VAD.
  • Have gained an understanding the role of health professionals in end-of-life care.
  • Have received a description of some research on assisted dying and grief outcomes for bereaved family members; and on suicide and age, physical health concerns, and pain.
  • Have garnered an appreciation of the meaning and challenges of decision-making capacity in the context of VAD.
  • Have been presented an outline of the practical and ethical implications for mental health and social care professionals working with clients who might consider end-of-life options in jurisdictions where VAD is legal and where it is not.

 

Presenter Biography

Lauren Breen is an Associate Professor in psychology at Curtin University. Lauren is a Registered Psychologist, an Associate Editor of Death Studies, a Fellow in Thanatology: Death, Dying and Bereavement, and a member of the International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement. Lauren was successful in the inaugural round of the prestigious Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Awards for her project exploring family caregiving and bereavement and has authored 10 book chapters and over 80 journal articles.

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00
Understanding Grief and Loss — Indigenous Healing
Understanding Grief and Loss — Indigenous Healing
Presenter: Rosemary Wanganeen

Recorded: May 22nd, 2019

Webinar Overview

This webinar will present a culturally appropriate Aboriginal designed model called the Seven Phases to Integrating Loss and Grief that integrates into a non-Aboriginal loss and grief model derived from ‘lived experiences’. It is focussed towards highly developed professionals in the justice and health industries.

Learning Outcomes

Following this webinar you will:

  • Understand through the Seven Phases how and why the presenter had a ‘contemporary major grief reaction’ that was not just a physical experience but a deeply spiritual one. In so doing, you will learn the value in ‘hearing voices’ that are spiritually bases and not a part of a mental illness.
  • Understand through the presentation of the Seven Phases how critical it is to understand how childhood and adolescent losses and unresolved grief can ‘stunt’ mental and emotional growth, causing immaturity in adulthood for life, unless a culturally appropriate grieving process is available. Participants will learn what are ‘inner children and adolescents’ versus an ‘inner child’.
  • Through the Seven Phases, participants will learn why the loss of traditional culture is critical to understand when supporting Aboriginal people. In so doing will learn how suppressing ancestral grief becomes intergenerational which then compounds and complicates contemporary Aboriginal losses and unresolved grief.
  • Participants will learn why traditional Aboriginal culture had developed a multitude of systems that gave them not just practices to survive but thrive over 60,000yrs, including traditional grieving ceremonies for the health and wellbeing of their physical body.
  • Participants will learn why traditional Aboriginal culture had developed a multitude of systems that gave them not just practices to survive but thrive over 60,000yrs, including traditional grieving ceremonies that maintained the health and wellbeing of the spirit ‘staying’ connected to the physical body.
  • Participants will learn how the Seven Phases had the capacity to develop a culturally appropriate counselling program & workshops:
    1. Bi-cultural Awareness, Safety for Inclusion workshop
    2. Aboriginal Loss, Grief and Suicide Prevention workshop
    3. Become your own Advocate workshop
  • Participants will understand why it’s important to develop a new discipline called Griefology to train Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students who are seeking a culturally appropriate approach to preventing ‘Aboriginal’ disadvantage and help Aboriginal people develop ‘Aboriginal’ prosperity.

 

Presenter Biography

Rosemary Wanganeen

Rosemary is a proud South Australian Aboriginal woman! She founded the Sacred Site Within Healing Centre in 1993 preceded by Australian Institute for Loss and Grief in 2005. She applied her personal ‘lived experiences’ to research and develop her now published Seven Phases to Integrating Loss and Grief. As a Griefologist she’s been accepted into Adelaide University for her Master in Philosophy with a view to completing a PHD to further develop griefology as a new discipline. Her proudest moments:

Standard price: 75.00
Discounted price: 50.00
75.00